Week Thirteen
 
Sunday, February 23, 2003
 
Weight:      5 lbs. 11 oz. (2581 grams)
Feedings:  46 cc of Breast Milk (27 cal) + Dextrose
Head:        32 cm
 
Bailey had a good day today.  She seamed much happier and more content than I have seen her in a long time.  In the afternoon, Bailey received a visit from her Grandma and Grandpa Lindbloom (picture below).  Later that night, when mom and I were holding Bailey she was wide awake and alert.  She kept staring at Stacey and me.  I love it when she does that.  Also, she was quite interested in the stuffed animal we were waving around in front of her face.  I haven't seen her awake and interacting for a long time.  It was god to see her like this.
 
Bailey's Morphine is still at 0.2 ml/hour.
 
 
 
Monday, February 24, 2003
 
Weight:      5 lbs. 14 oz. (2661 grams)
Feedings:  49 cc of Breast Milk (27 cal) + Dextrose
Ab. Girth: 32 cm
 
Bailey was put on cannula today at 10:30 AM.  The cannula was set at 2 liters/minute flow with 60% oxygen.  From the time we spent with our daughter today we could tell that she was very happy and content.  When she was awake she was very happy.  She loves to put her hands in and by her mouth.  Bailey's occupational therapist told us that this is a feeding instinct and that it is a good sign that she will be able to bottle/breast feed without much trouble.  We put her in her chair for a little while and she really enjoyed the stuffed animals we waved in front of her.
 
 
 
Tuesday, February 25, 2003
 
Weight:      5 lbs. 14.5 oz. (2678 grams)
Feedings:  53 cc of Breast Milk (27 cal)
 
Today was Bailey's due date.  It's kind of funny to think that she is three months old on her due date.  We really hope to bring her home soon.
 
At 8:30 AM Bailey was again taken off the nasal cannula.  An x-ray showed that her lungs were poorly inflated so she was placed back on the nasal CPAP.  If the inflation of Baileys lungs was to get any worse, they would run the risk of collapsing.  If they collapsed, Bailey would have to be placed back on a ventilator.  Although we would like to see Bailey stay on the cannula, we definitely don't want to see her back on a ventilator.  As such, we will deal with the step backwards to the nasal CPAP.  Bailey' Morphine drip was also stopped today.
 
 
Wednesday, February 26, 2003
 
Weight:      6 lbs. 1.5 oz. (2769 grams)
Feedings:  53 cc of Breast Milk (27 cal)
 
Bailey now weighs over 6 pounds!
 
Bailey's PIC line in her right foot came out today making her line free once again.  This means that we will be able to give her a bath in a tub again.  We were going to give her a bath before leaving the NICU this evening, but I decided to wait until tomorrow.  Stacey was so tired that I took her home early and returned to the hospital by myself to spend time with Bailey.  Bathing her tonight would have meant that Stacey would not have been able to help.  Giving Bailey a bath is one of the fun things we get to do at the hospital so I decided to wait until tomorrow so that Stacey could help.
 
Bailey's ophthalmologist checked her eyes again this evening.  He said they looked "fabulous" and that he would come back in two weeks, instead of one week, to check her eyes again.
 
Bailey has completely recovered her voice.  Her little cries now sound just like a newborn baby's.  This makes them all that much more precious and sad.  I never thought I would say that I am happy to hear a child cry.
 
 
Thursday, February 27, 2003
 
Weight:      6 lbs. (2728 grams)
Feedings:  55 cc of Breast Milk (24 cal)
 
Once again, Bailey was put on cannula today at about 10:30 AM.  It was set to 60% oxygen with a flow of 2 liters/minute just like before.  Although all the settings are the same, we hope the outcome is different.  We really hope that she can stay on cannula this time around.  By 8:00 PM her oxygen had been weaned to 40%.
 
Babies that go home on a cannula usually receive 0.5 liters/minute flow.  We are still optimistic that Bailey will get to this point sometime in March (and learn to feed) so that we can take her home.
 
Bailey's feedings were raised to 55 cc and the calorie content was dropped to 24.
 
Today Bailey received her first tub bath since eye surgery.  This is one of the fun things we get to do as parents of a child who lives at the hospital.  The first two pictures below are of Bailey in the tub.  The third picture is after her bath (I picked out her bows).  Send us an email and let us know who you think she looks like.  To see a video of Bailey in the tub click here.
 
 
 
Friday, February 28, 2003
 
Weight:      6 lbs. 2.5 oz. (2793 grams)
Feedings:  55 cc of Breast Milk (24 cal)
Length:     17 inches
 
Bailey showed good progress today.  She has been on cannula for a little more than 36 hours and her flow was turned down to .75 liters/minute.  Her oxygen was still high (60%) but she is doing well.  We are hopeful that they will be able to turn her oxygen down in the next couple of days.  If all goes well, Stacey will try to feed Bailey on Monday.
 
We finally took our CPR class last night and are ready for Bailey to come home.
 
This is a picture of Bailey with a half smile.  It is the only one we have so far of her smiling.
 
 
 
Saturday, March 1, 2003
 
Weight:      6 lbs. 2 oz. (2774 grams)
Feedings:  56 cc of Breast Milk (24 cal)
 
Because Bailey's CO2 have been consistently at the desired level, the TCM (the machine that measures that partial pressures of CO2 and O2 in Bailey's blood stream) will no longer be used on a continuous basis.  Instead, Bailey will be randomly spot checked throughout the day.  Not only does this mean that Bailey is getting stronger and more mature, it also means that there is one less machine connected to her (one step closer to going home)!
 
Bailey is still on cannula.  Her flow was slightly increased today to a little over 1 liter/minute but her oxygen remained at 60%.  Urine samples were taken to check and see if Bailey has kidney stones.  Those samples came back negative.  Also, a long bone study was done to make sure that Bailey didn't have any hairline fractures.  The x-rays showed no fractures of any kind.
 
Because Bailey has been doing so well, Stacey was able to try and breast feed her.  What she attempted is called non-nutritive breast feeding.  The purpose of this type of feeding is not to give Bailey any milk.  It is to teach her how to suck and that sucking means she is going to be fed.  Having just pumped, to make sure that Bailey won't get any substantial milk, Stacey helps Bailey learn to latch on.  Meanwhile, Bailey is being fed through her NG tube.  Bailey did really well, and so did Stacey.  The nurse said that she had never seen anyone as natural at breast feeding as Stacey.  Stacey said she felt like a "real" mom and that she really liked it when Bailey would just stare at her while feeding.
 
Stacey and Bailey will do non-nutritive feeding twice a day until it is time to try nutritive feeding.